Armitt calls for evidence of infrastructure needs

The first nationwide call for input to inform the nation's long term infrasructure needs goes out this morning. A coalition of business, industry, academic and environment leaders are gathering evidence to assess the UK’s future infrastructure needs, and how they could be met, for the National Infrastructure Commission. The findings will feed into the first 'National Needs Assessment' due to be published by the NIC in autumn, setting out infrastructure needs up to 2050 together with what government and industry must do to make the vision a reality.

The coalition undertaking the National Needs Assessment is being chaired by Institution of Civil Engineers President and NIC Commissioner Sir John Armitt. It also includes industry leaders from the CBI, KPMG, Pinsent Masons, University of Cambridge, University of Oxford, National Grid, London First, the Green Alliance, Transport for Greater Manchester, Thames Water and the Scottish Council for Development and Industry. 

Sir John Armitt said: “Effective infrastructure drives growth, supports job creation and creates thriving, sustainable societies. But infrastructure is expensive, can be disruptive during construction, and requires fine political judgement so resources are best used to meet the country’s needs."

Former Labour Cabinet Minister Lord Adonis is leading the new National Infrastructure Commission which will determine Britain’s infrastructure priorities and hold governments to account for their delivery.

The Commission will also include Sadie Morgan, architect and chair of the HS2 design panel plus leading infrastructure economist Bridget Rosewell.

“The National Infrastructure Commission has been established to provide dispassionate analysis on these long term needs, and act as a catalyst for reaching consensus so vital projects are built," Armitt said. "The recommendations it makes must therefore be robust, evidence based and help policy-makers with the often difficult and controversial decisions they have to take.




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